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Author: Andre Venter

Essential Guide to the Brain Part 5 | The Neuropsychotherapist

Essential Guide to the Brain Part 5 | The Neuropsychotherapist

by Matthew Dahlitz | Jun 1, 2016 | Magazine, Neuroscience The Psychotherapist’s Essential Guide to the Brain – Part 5 Fear & Anxiety Members Download Full Article TNPTVolume4Issue6pp10-15 Last month’s “Guide to the Brain” examined the neural substrates of OCD. Over the next two months we introduce some of the neuroscience behind other anxiety disorders such as phobias, panic attacks, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and generalised anxiety disorder (GAD). These anxiety disorders can become debilitating, and as clinicians we encounter…

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Introduction to Antisocial Personality Disorder | Psych Central

Introduction to Antisocial Personality Disorder | Psych Central

By Donald Black, MD ~ 1 min read He is the bad boy in high school — stealing stuff from other kids and lying about it, picking fights, getting poor grades. But he doesn’t seem to care. Grown up, he’s a con artist — can’t hold a decent job, thinks life isn’t fair, and he’s still stealing and getting away with it most of the time. Someone with antisocial personality disorder (ASP) has a reckless disregard for others and often…

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When Your Child Is a Psychopath – The Atlantic

When Your Child Is a Psychopath – The Atlantic

This is a good day, Samantha tells me: 10 on a scale of 10. We’re sitting in a conference room at the San Marcos Treatment Center, just south of Austin, Texas, a space that has witnessed countless difficult conversations between troubled children, their worried parents, and clinical therapists. But today promises unalloyed joy. Samantha’s mother is visiting from Idaho, as she does every six weeks, which means lunch off campus and an excursion to Target. The girl needs supplies: new…

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Personality disorders and violence: what is the link?

Personality disorders and violence: what is the link?

Richard Howard Author information ► Article notes ► Copyright and License information ► This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Abstract Despite a well-documented association between personality disorders (PDs) and violence, the relationship between them is complicated by the high comorbidity of mental disorders, the heterogeneity of violence (particularly in regard to its motivation), and differing views regarding the way PDs are conceptualised and measured. In particular, it remains unclear whether there is a causal relationship between…

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Gaslighting and Distortion Campaigns | Out of the Mire

Gaslighting and Distortion Campaigns | Out of the Mire

July 12, 2013 / MJ I want to talk about a specific topic–gaslighting.  What is gaslighting? Gaslighting is a form of emotional abuse and/or psychological manipulation and intimidation wherein a person, the abuser, presents some kind of false information to the victim in an effort to manipulate perceptions and memory.  The end result of this manipulation is that the victim of the gaslighting feels crazy and doubts their own intuition and ability to remember information, observations, and events or even…

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How Does A Narcissist Think? | Psychology Today

How Does A Narcissist Think? | Psychology Today

How Does A Narcissist Think? Here is how narcissistic behavior is dangerous and harmful to others Is the word narcissism being over-used and thrown around lightly? Do we need a deeper understanding of narcissistic behavior and why it is harmful and even dangerous? Having studied this disorder for over 25 years, and in treating many victims of narcissists, I have seen firsthand how dangerous, harmful, and disarming the narcissist can be to others. There are certain traits of the narcissist…

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Supporting people with depression and anxiety A guide for practice nurses

Supporting people with depression and anxiety A guide for practice nurses

  This guide has been developed for GP practice nurses following a three year research study called ProCEED (Proactive care and its evaluation for enduring depression), conducted by Dr Marta Buszewicz and a research team at University College London.  The study involved a large number of practice and research nurses working in general practices throughout the UK. It was run in collaboration with the mental health charity Mind and funded by a grant from the Big Lottery fund.   Authors…

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Therapists Have Therapy Too | World of Psychology

Therapists Have Therapy Too | World of Psychology

By Drew Coster ~ 3 min read One thing that often surprises me is when a therapy user comments on how they admire the therapist because they must never get overwhelmed by the common issues or problems the rest of humanity experiences. The times I’ve heard people tell me, “I wish I was like you, you are so calm and together.” As much as I appreciate the compliment, that isn’t always true. I’ve been through psychotherapy before. As a trainee…

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My Family Medicine Practice: Anorexia nervosa

My Family Medicine Practice: Anorexia nervosa

Anorexia nervosa     Introduction The key feature of anorexia nervosa is self-imposed starvation resulting from a distorted body image and an intense and irrational fear of gaining weight, even when the patient is obviously emaciated. An anorexic patient is preoccupied with her body size, describes herself as “fat,” and commonly expresses dissatisfaction with a particular aspect of her physical appearance. Although the term anorexia suggests that the patient’s weight loss is associated with a loss of appetite, this is…

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Essential Guide To The Brain Part 4 | The Neuropsychotherapist

Essential Guide To The Brain Part 4 | The Neuropsychotherapist

The Neural Underpinnings of OCD Obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) is a common anxiety condition characterised by recurring, upsetting thoughts (obsessions) that are typically along themes of contamination, doubts, the need to order things, impending doom, or aggression, just to name a few. These obsessions are managed by ritualistic actions (compulsions) such as hand washing, checking, ordering, counting, praying, and other sequences of action or thought. People who suffer from OCD feel driven to perform specific compulsions to mitigate the anxiety generated…

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